Tag Archive for NASA Image and Video Library

NASA Has Launched New Public Multimedia Library

AS16-113-18339 (21 April 1972) — Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, leaps from the lunar surface as he salutes the United States flag at the Descartes landing site during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity (EVA). Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, took this picture. The Lunar Module (LM) “Orion” is on the left. The Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is parked beside the LM. The object behind Young (in the shade of the LM) is the Far Ultraviolet Camera/Spectrograph (FUC/S). Stone Mountain dominates the background in this lunar scene. While astronauts Young and Duke descended in the LM to explore the Descartes highlands landing site on the moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) “Casper” in lunar orbit.

Do you like space related photos, audio & video? Then stop what you’re doing and visit images.nasa.gov now!

NASA Image and Video Library allows users to search, discover and download a treasure trove of more than 140,000 NASA images, videos and audio files from across the agency’s many missions in aeronautics, astrophysics, Earth science, human spaceflight, and more. Users now can embed content in their own sites and choose from multiple resolutions to download.

Visitors can browse NASA’s most recently uploaded files, as well as discover historic and the most popularly searched images, audio files and videos.

Additional features include:

  • Automatically scales the interface for mobile phones and tablets
  • Displays the EXIF/camera data that includes exposure, lens used, and other information, when available from the original image
  • Allows for easy public access to high resolution files
  • All video includes a downloadable caption file

NASA Image and Video Library’s Application Programmers Interface (API) allows automation of imagery uploads for NASA, and gives members of the public the ability to embed content in their own sites and applications. (That’s geekspeak for a pretty cool feature.)

The library is not comprehensive, but rather provides the best of what NASA makes publicly available from a single point of presence on the web. Additionally, it is a living website, where new and archival images, video and audio files continually will be added.

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