Tag Archive for Marion County Public Health Department

Health Department to Offer Special Flu Shot Clinics Oct 24, 26 & Nov 2

The Marion County Public Health Department is offering low-cost flu shots at eight special walk-in clinics scheduled around the community in October and early November. These clinics are in addition to the flu shots available through the health’s department’s district health offices.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the flu vaccine for everyone six months of age and older. It is especially important for pregnant women, people age 65 and older, and anyone with certain medical conditions including asthma, diabetes and chronic lung disease.

Flu shots are $20 for adults and for children ages 2-18. Some fees may be waived based on insurance status. Shots for children under two years old are free. The special walks-in clinics are scheduled for the following locations and times:

Tuesday, Oct. 24
Southport Presbyterian Church
7525 McFarland Blvd.
9 a.m.-Noon

Thursday, Oct. 26
Cathedral Kitchen
1350 N. Pennsylvania St.
9-11 a.m.

Thursday, Nov. 2
Sharing Place
(located inside the Lawrence Education and Community Center)
6501 Sunnyside Rd.
10 a.m.-Noon

The post Health Department to Offer Special Flu Shot Clinics Oct 24, 26 & Nov 2 appeared first on Naptown Buzz.

Mosquitoes Carrying West Nile Virus Found in Marion County

The Marion County Public Health Department reports the first mosquitoes of the season found carrying West Nile virus. The Mosquito Control program checks surveillance traps around Marion County each day to monitor the local mosquito population and test for West Nile virus.

When mosquitoes from a trap test positive for West Nile virus, Mosquito Control increases its prevention efforts during daytime and evening hours in the area where the trap is located.

No human cases of the virus have been reported so far this year in Marion County.

Most people who become infected with West Nile virus do not develop any symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People with certain medical conditions, such as cancer, diabetes and kidney disease are at greater risk experiencing symptoms which include headache, body aches, joint pains or rash. Less than one percent of people who are infected with West Nile virus will develop a serious neurological illness such as encephalitis or meningitis.

The Marion County Public Health Department reminds everyone to stay protected from mosquito bites by following the Four D’s of Mosquito Control:

  • DUSK – Stay indoors from dusk until dawn. If you do spend time outdoors….
  • DRESS – Wear long sleeves and long pants when outside during these times.
  • DEET – Use insect repellent containing DEET.
  • DRAINAGE – Remove all standing water outside the home.

“Even a small amount of standing water outside is a potential breeding ground for mosquitoes,” said Matt Sinsko, coordinator of Mosquito Control at the Marion County Public Health Department. ”We encourage residents to empty water from containers of any size and flush out bird baths every week. Check for old tires, clogged gutters, small recreational pools, and poorly operating septic systems.”

For questions about mosquito prevention, please call the Marion County Public Health Department’s Mosquito Control program at 317-221-7440.

The post Mosquitoes Carrying West Nile Virus Found in Marion County appeared first on Naptown Buzz.

Mosquitoes Carrying West Nile Virus Found in Marion County

The Marion County Public Health Department reports the first mosquitoes of the season found carrying West Nile virus. The Mosquito Control program checks surveillance traps around Marion County each day to monitor the local mosquito population and test for West Nile virus.

When mosquitoes from a trap test positive for West Nile virus, Mosquito Control increases its prevention efforts during daytime and evening hours in the area where the trap is located.

No human cases of the virus have been reported so far this year in Marion County.

Most people who become infected with West Nile virus do not develop any symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People with certain medical conditions, such as cancer, diabetes and kidney disease are at greater risk experiencing symptoms which include headache, body aches, joint pains or rash. Less than one percent of people who are infected with West Nile virus will develop a serious neurological illness such as encephalitis or meningitis.

The Marion County Public Health Department reminds everyone to stay protected from mosquito bites by following the Four D’s of Mosquito Control:

  • DUSK – Stay indoors from dusk until dawn. If you do spend time outdoors….
  • DRESS – Wear long sleeves and long pants when outside during these times.
  • DEET – Use insect repellent containing DEET.
  • DRAINAGE – Remove all standing water outside the home.

“Even a small amount of standing water outside is a potential breeding ground for mosquitoes,” said Matt Sinsko, coordinator of Mosquito Control at the Marion County Public Health Department. ”We encourage residents to empty water from containers of any size and flush out bird baths every week. Check for old tires, clogged gutters, small recreational pools, and poorly operating septic systems.”

For questions about mosquito prevention, please call the Marion County Public Health Department’s Mosquito Control program at 317-221-7440.

The post Mosquitoes Carrying West Nile Virus Found in Marion County appeared first on Naptown Buzz.

National Infant Immunization Week Runs April 22-29

National Infant Immunization Week, April 22-29, highlights the importance of protecting infants from vaccine-preventable diseases and celebrates how immunization programs are promoting healthy communities.

Vaccinating children on time is the best way to keep them safe from 14 serious and potentially deadly diseases before their second birthday.

“Following the recommended vaccination schedule helps protect babies early in life when they are most vulnerable,” said Virginia A. Caine, M.D., director of the Marion County Public Health Department. “Getting children all the vaccines they need by age two is one of the best things parents can do to help keep their children healthy.”

Public health and medical experts base their vaccine recommendations on a number of reasons. They study information about diseases and vaccines very carefully to decide which vaccines kids should receive and when they should get them for best protection.

Although the number of vaccines a child needs in the first two years may seem like a lot, doctors know a great deal about the human immune system. They know that a healthy baby’s immune system can handle receiving all vaccines when they are recommended.

Dr. Caine cautions against parents delaying vaccination because this puts babies at risk of getting sick from serious infectious diseases. When parents choose not to vaccinate or follow a delayed schedule, children are left unprotected against diseases that are still passed from person-to-person in this country, like measles and whooping cough.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. has seen between 10,000-50,000 cases of whooping cough each year since 2010. Plus, up to 20 babies die from whooping cough each year in the U.S. Most whooping cough deaths are among babies who are too young to receive their own vaccination.

The Marion County Public Health Department offers low-cost immunizations for infants and people of all ages at its district health offices. Children and young adults from up to age 26 can also go to the ACTION Health Center. For a list of vaccinations and health office locations, visit MarionHealth.org or call the health department’s Immunizations Program at 317-221-2122.

Consult your child’s medical provider about questions regarding the immunization schedule. Vaccine information is also available at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents.

SOURCE: Marion County Public Health Department

The post National Infant Immunization Week Runs April 22-29 appeared first on Naptown Buzz.

ABCs of Diabetes Self-Management Classes in February

ABCs of Diabetes is a free four-part series on diabetes self-management offered by the Marion County Public Health Department. Topics include diet, medications, exercise, monitoring, and long-term management. Class members participate in individual consultations with a registered dietitian and a registered nurse.

Classes are hosted monthly, January through November, at the health department or library locations in Marion County.

In February, ABCs of Diabetes will take place at the Speedway Library, 5633 W. 25th St., on Tuesdays, February 7, 14, 21 and 28 from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Classes are offered free of charge, but advance registration is required. Class members should plan to attend all four classes.

To register, or to learn more about the program, please call 317-221-2094 or visit MarionHealth.org/diabetes.

The Marion County Public Health Department receives accreditation for the ABCs of Diabetes program through the American Association for Diabetes Educators’ (AADE) Diabetes Education Accreditation Program.

Accredited programs must meet or exceed ten standards for program structure, access, staffing, curriculum, and services for participants, and must be able to demonstrate its effectiveness.

SOURCE: Marion County Public Health Department

The post ABCs of Diabetes Self-Management Classes in February appeared first on Naptown Buzz.

Covering Kids & Families Back to School Family Day is July 30

color-logo-sloganCovering Kids & Families of Central Indiana hosts its 16th annual Back to School Family Day on Saturday, July 30 from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. on the grounds of the Marion County Public Health Department, 3838 N. Rural St. More than 8,000 people attended this free event in 2015.

Each child who attends receives a backpack with free school supplies. Back-to-school health services will also be offered, including free immunizations, vision screenings, dental screenings, lead screenings, and sports physicals. Parents or guardians should bring current shot records as well as an insurance or Medicaid card for any children seeking immunizations.

Parents can also get a copy of their child’s birth certificate, free to the first 50 children who need one.

Those who need health insurance can get enrolled on-site for Hoosier Healthwise, Health Advantage, Healthy Indiana Plan (HIP) 2.0, or plans available through the Affordable Care Act. In order to enroll, the following documents are needed: income stubs from the last three months, Social Security number, and proof of address in Marion County.

Not to be missed is the Indianapolis Fire Department’s popular Fire Safety Festival, providing entertainment with games, food and hands-on educational displays. Plus, nearly 60 community organizations will host booths with information about programs, resources and services.

“This is a perfect one-stop opportunity for families to get kids ready for school,” said Pamela Humes, program director of Covering Kids & Families of Central Indiana. “What makes this event successful is the support we receive from all of the community agencies and organizations who participate.”

For more information about Back to School Family Day, please call 317-221-2464 or visit ckfindiana.org. Covering Kids & Families of Central Indiana is a program of Health & Hospital Corporation of Marion County.

The post Covering Kids & Families Back to School Family Day is July 30 appeared first on Naptown Buzz.

2016 Mosquitoes Carrying West Nile Virus Found in Marion County

The Marion County Public Health Department reports the first mosquitoes of the season found carrying West Nile virus.

Health Department Offers Free ABCs of Diabetes Classes in March

The Marion County Public Health Department will offer low-cost seasonal flu shots at six flu vaccine clinics during the month of October. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the flu vaccine every year for anyone 6 months of age and older.

Health Department Offers Flu Shot Clinics in October

The Marion County Public Health Department will offer low-cost seasonal flu shots at six flu vaccine clinics during the month of October. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the flu vaccine every year for anyone 6 months of age and older.

Marion County Reports Human Case of West Nile Virus

The Marion County Public Health Department is reporting the county’s first human case of West Nile virus for 2015. Mosquitoes carrying West Nile virus have been found in surveillance traps in all townships of Marion County.